Compliance Blog

10 Signs You Need to Update Your Code of Conduct Training

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workplace code of conduct and code of ethics training

To err is human – but to err in the workplace can create all kinds of problems. That’s why it’s essential that your Code of Conduct training is specially tailored to your organization and relevant to your employees, customers, partners and third parties. Are you confident your Code of Conduct training is actually helping to change employee behavior and attitudes?

Here are 10 signs to help you decide:

  1. You ask a random sample of employees if they’re familiar with your Code of Conduct and 9 out of 10 say, “Was I supposed to read that?”
  2. Political discussions in your break room sometimes sound like Fox News vs MSNBC and revert to name calling and bullying.
  3. The sales team is feeling pressure to hit their quota and you hear chatter about “doing whatever it takes to get the deal done.”
  4. Your digital marketing manager proudly announces he is freelancing for a start-up within your industry.
  5. A purchasing manager receives two Hamilton tickets from a vendor right before contract-renewal time.
  6. The office printer keeps jamming from employees printing out their kids’ summer camp handbooks.
  7. You find a stack of personnel records with performance reviews and salary histories left in the restroom.
  8. You overhear an employee giving out her email login to a coworker so she doesn’t miss any messages while traveling.
  9. An executive assistant tweets out part of an internal memo about the CEO’s medical leave.
  10. A managing director shares confidential plans for a new product with a close friend who’s looking for a stock tip.  

Traliant Insight
The most effective workplace ethics training leaves no doubt which behaviors are acceptable and which are not. No matter what industry you’re in, your Code of Conduct training should not only reflect your organization’s values and principles, it should give you confidence that employees know how to identify situations that pose potential conflicts and violations, and understand their responsibility to report wrongdoing whenever they see or suspect it.  

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