COVID-19, Returning to the Workplace – Rhode Island

Rhode Island – Rules to keep you safe at Work

Complete daily COVID-19 symptom screenings before entering your workplace

Screening questions:

  1. Do you have any of these symptoms that are not caused by another condition?

People with COVID-19 have had a wide range of symptoms reported – ranging from mild symptoms to severe illness. Symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure to the virus.

People with these symptoms may have COVID-19:

*This list does not include all possible symptoms. CDC will continue to update this list as we learn more about COVID-19.

  1. Within the past 14 days, have you had contact with anyone that you know had COVID-19 or COVID-like symptoms? Contact is being 6 feet (2 meters) or closer for more than 15 minutes with a person, or having direct contact with fluids from a person with COVID-19 (for example, being coughed or sneezed on).
  2. Have you had a positive COVID-19 test for active virus in the past 10 days?
  3. Within the past 14 days, has a public health or medical professional told you to self-monitor, self-isolate, or self-quarantine because of concerns about COVID-19 infection?

Importance of not coming to work if ill

If you are sick with COVID-19 or think you might have COVID-19, follow the steps below to care for yourself and to help protect other people in your home and community.

When to seek emergency medical attention:

*This list is not all possible symptoms. Please call your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning to you.

Call 911 or call ahead to your local emergency facility: Notify the operator that you are seeking care for someone who has or may have COVID-19.

Social Distancing Guidelines

Hygiene

Proper respiratory etiquette from the CDC

Covering coughs and sneezes and keeping hands clean can help prevent the spread of serious respiratory illnesses like influenza, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), whooping cough, and COVID-19. Germs can be easily spread by:

Covering coughs and sneezes and washing hands are especially important for infection control measures in healthcare settings, such as emergency departments, doctor’s offices, and clinics.

To help stop the spread of germs:

Remember to immediately wash your hands after blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing.

Washing your hands is one of the most effective ways to prevent yourself and your loved ones from getting sick, especially at key times when you are likely to get and spread germs.

For information about preventing the spread of COVID-19, see CDC’s COVID-19: Prevent Getting Sick web page.

To help prevent the spread of respiratory disease, you can also avoid close contact with people who are sick. If you are ill, you should try to distance yourself from others so you do not spread your germs. Distancing includes staying home from work or school when possible.

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

Things that are PPE;